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Haylee Burton
05/06/2013 9:30am

T: Here’s To My Socks

P: Mara Mori brought me a pair of socks that she knitted herself
With her hands that she uses to herd sheep
The socks were as soft as two rabbits.
I slipped my feet into them and they fit perfectly.
My feet could be two long sharks or two crows depending on the color.
My feet seemed to be honored when wearing these socks.
My feet looked so handsome in them.
My feet were unworthy of these socks,
Like two firemen unworthy of the fire they’re supposed to put out.

I had to resist the temptation to hide these socks away
Like schoolboys do with fireflies, wise men with books I had to resist the temptation to cage these socks up like birds and feed them melons
Like explorers who devour foods with remorse,
I put the socks on and slipped my shoes over top of them.

The moral of this poem is this:
Beauty is twice as beautiful when there are two
Especially when there are two socks made out of wool in the winter.

C: 1) Simile - “two socks as soft as rabbits”
2) Metaphor - “my feet were two fish made of wool”
3) Personification - “to put them in a golden cage and each day give them birdseed and pieces of pink melon; two long sharks, sea blue, shot through by one golden thread”

A: The narrator of this poem seems very grateful and in awe at how wonderful the two socks are. How they keep him or her warm in the cold winter, how beautifully crafted they are. But I also think that they are slowly becoming unsatisfied with the socks the more they wear them.

S: The shift between awe and dissatisfaction starts between the lines “To spit it and eat it with remorse / I stretched out my feet and pulled on the magnificent socks and then my shoes”

T: This poem is about how grateful they are for the socks, kind of like a tribute to them. Saying thanks for keeping me warm, maybe.

T: The theme of this poem is to be thankful for what you have even if it’s something as simple as a pair of socks. Appreciate beauty in little things.

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Sarah Oechsle
05/06/2013 7:08pm

Response to: Haylee Burton
I thought that your interpretation of this poem was interesting. It was very different from mine actually. I interpreted the poem to mean that ordinary objects are "doubly" beautiful when they are aesthetically pleasing as well as functional. I thought it was interesting that the speaker wanted to display the socks like some sort of exotic trophy, but instead decided to use them for their proper use which made them that much better. I am interested as to why you think he began to lose interest in the socks.

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Megan Joyner- Response
05/06/2013 7:14pm

I thought that your interpretation of the poem was very interesting and made a lot of sense, especially how you described the theme as “thankful”. I interpreted the poem a little differently, but I really like how you were able to realize the point in time between gratefulness and unhappiness between the author and the socks. You did an awesome job emphasizing the use of metaphors and similes that Pablo Neruda used. For example, you described the metaphor in which the the feet “were two fish made of wool”. Your TPCASTT was very accurate and was a great analysis of the poem.


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Megan Joyner-Response(adding on)
05/07/2013 7:21am

Your description of similes and mataphords was very true and expressed exactly what Pablo Neruda was trying to display. You used the quote, "two socks as soft as rabbits", to display his use of similes, and for a metaphor you used "my feet were two fish made of wool". You did a great job emphasizing everything that Pablo Neruda discussed.

Daniel Allred Response to Haylee Burton
05/07/2013 7:11pm

I think you were right about the theme of the poem being thankfulness, but I also thing the poem could be his interpretation of how beauty should be looked at. At the very end of the poem he describes beauty as coming in pairs and I think that the socks may have been a metaphor for beauty in the world. He saw the socks as something beautiful and he compared it to the rest of the world.

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Megan Joyner
05/06/2013 6:57pm

Title: “Ode to My Socks” By Pablo Neruda

Title: The title is describing the poet's excitement and joy towards his socks. The sock may have a symbolic meaning, such as protection or comfort.

Paraphrase:

Mara Mori bought me socks.

She, a sheepherder, knitted the socks.

The socks felt very soft, similar to rabbit fur.

I put the socks on and they acted like casing on my feet.

They were made out of goatskin and twilight.

The socks were violent.

My feet were similar to two fish made of wool.

They were similar to two long sharks.

The socks were the color of the sea, and were stitched with a golden thread.

The socks were two black birds.

They were two cannons.

The socks were honorary to my feet.

They were so pleasing to my eye that I could not accept my own feet.

They were two firemen not worthy of the fire that the socks contained.

I did not give in to the temptation of keeping these socks.

This temptation is similar to small children collecting fireflies or businessmen collecting taxes.

I resisted the temptation to lock them inside bird cages and treat them like birds.

Similar to how jungle explorers hunt deer and eat it with guilt I put on my socks and shoes.

The lesson of my ode is this:

Beauty is double beauty, and good is twice as good when we are discussing socks made out of wool in the dead of winter.

Connotation:

Diction was used to describe the socks. They were described as decrepit, violent, and even immense, all of which adds to the poem and its tone.

Symbolism is used through the socks. Although socks are just random items, it symbolizes the normal people and average folk.

Imagery was used to describe the look and feel of the socks. The socks locked like foot casings, and even felt similar to rabbit fur.

Many metaphors and similes were used to describe the socks. Some examples of the similes include how the author wrote about collecting the socks. He describes collecting the socks like “schoolboys keep fireflies” and how “men collect taxes.” A simile is also used to compare jungle explorers to how the author felt about his socks.

Metaphors were also used to describe the feet in the poem. The feet were “two sharks” or “two cases”. His feet were “canons” and “blackbirds”.

The poem contained no rhyme scheme.

The poem showed enjambment due to Neruda’s scarce use of periods. He used many commas to separate the lines, but periods were used almost once per stanza.

The mood of the poem was very joyful and carefree. It was lackadaisical due to the topic of socks and how odd or bland it was.

Punctuation: Each line that starts a new topic begins with a capital letter. However in the middle of one idea, the word violent was capitalized in order to emphasize its importance and due to its connotation, which usually is negative and alerts the reader.

Attitude: The author’s attitude is positive, describing the joy and beauty of a simple pair of socks. The tone is easy going and calm, allowing Neruda to make his poem come across as a lite and simple topic, opposed to other deep poems.

Shifts in the poem occurred after the first stanza. The first stanza talked about the comfort and soft feel of the socks, but throughout the rest of the poem the socks were described with harsher diction and meaning, creating a slightly uneasy feeling, especially with the word” violent”.

Title: The title “Ode to Socks” matched the meaning of the poem, as it discussed the joy and meaning of simple life and simples ideas such as a pair of socks.

Theme : The theme describes ordinary life, and its simplicity. It relates to common people by using socks to symbolize the simple concept. Although the idea of a pair of sock seems simple, Pablo Neruda used them to describe how even bland issues or topics have a deeper meaning and another side to them.




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Meleah Travis
05/08/2013 7:06am

I think your interpretation of this poem is straight on. I love the description he gives of the socks. They're almost dynamic in a way, able to take on different appearances like the fish, sharks, blackbirds, and cannons. Your description of theme was different than mine. While you said it was simply things can have a deeper meaning, mine was don't limit the joy simply items like socks can bring you. Enjoy the simply things in life along with the big.

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Megan Joyner
05/06/2013 7:05pm

The poem "Ode to My Socks" was very simple and described a pair of socks. However, Neruda described these socks in various ways by using metaphors and imagery. His use of imagery describes the feel of the the socks. He wrote, "two socks as soft as rabbits", to create a feeling of softness and comfort. When he put the socks on his feet he used metaphors and related them to other objects. He said they were "two cannons" and "two immense blackbirds". His use of figurative language helped to paint a vivid picture of the socks and to add to the meaning of the poem. The socks represented ordinary life, but if thought about in a new point of view thay can represent anyhting from "sharks" to "blackbirds".

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Megan Joyner(adding on to blog post)
05/07/2013 7:29am

Pablo Neruda's most memorable figurative language used in this poem was similes and metaphors. He used similes to describe collecting the socks as "school boys keep fireflies" and "learned men collect taxes". His use of metaphors noted that his feet were "canons" and "blackbirds". Pablo Neruda's use of this language added to the poem by giving the reader detail and set the basis for the theme of simplicity.

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Haylee Burton
05/07/2013 7:32am

I agree with you 100%, Megan. I loved the way that Neruda used figurative language to convey how the socks look to the reader. I could imagine the soft socks on my feet, and I thought it was really cool how he said that they could be tons of different things. Mara Mori only gave him one pair of socks but he spent so much time turning them into different creatures that (I think) he was sad when he had to cover them up. He had to come to realization that they weren't these exotic animals but regular old socks that are just supposed to keep your feet warm.

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Haylee Burton
05/07/2013 7:27am

"Ode to My Socks" by Pablo Neruda was an interesting poem to me. He made the socks seem like they were some unknown, amazing creature with this language. He uses similes to make to show how they fit on his feet, with "I slipped my feet into them as if they were two cases." They fit his feet perfectly, like they were made just for him and him only. He also uses other examples of figurative language when describing what the socks look like by saying, "my feet were two fish made of wool, two long sharks, sea blue, shot through by one golden thread." Neruda uses his imagination to make it feel as though these socks could be whatever he wanted them to be, even though they're just a pair of socks made from wool. I believe he starts to become unsatisfied with the socks the more he wears them, or becomes sadder as he has to put them away. When Neruda says, "Like explorers in the jungle who hand over rare green deer to spit and eat it with remorse, I stretched out my feet and pulled on the magnificent socks and then my shoes." He wants to keep this one good thing in his life, these socks that were a handmade gift from the heart; he doesn't want to break them, damage them. They're beautiful socks that do so much for him, but above all they do what they're supposed to do - keep his feet warm in the cold days of winter. He's grateful that he has them because Mara Mori didn't have to give them to him, so he cherishes these socks, as silly as it sounds.

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Megan Joyner-Response
05/07/2013 7:32am

I thought that your interpretation of the poem was very interesting and made a lot of sense, especially how you described the theme as “thankful”. I interpreted the poem a little differently, but I really like how you were able to realize the point in time between gratefulness and unhappiness between the author and the socks. You did an awesome job emphasizing the use of metaphors and similes that Pablo Neruda used. Your description of similes and mataphors was very true and expressed exactly what Pablo Neruda was trying to display. You used the quote, "two socks as soft as rabbits", to display his use of similes, and for a metaphor you used "my feet were two fish made of wool". You did a great job emphasizing everything that Pablo Neruda discussed.
Your TPCASTT and response was very accurate and was a great analysis of the poem.



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Tyler Woods (in response to Haylee Burton
05/07/2013 7:42am

I enjoyed reading your interpretation of the poem. My interpretation was sort of similar. I felt as if the socks had something usual to them such as a mystery. I also agree that he used a lot of his imagination to make it feel as the socks could be whatever he wanted them to be even though they are just a pair of socks. It's like he took something simple and changed the pair of socks into something magical. Also him cherishing the socks I thought about what if Mara Mori didn't give him the socks and he just had happen to buy some, what would be his interpretation on the new pair of socks and would he cherish them just as much as the ones that Mara Mori had made for him.

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Sarah Oechsle (In response to Haylee Burton)
05/07/2013 6:15pm

I found your interpretation very interesting and also somewhat different from my own. I did not interpret the poem to mean that he was becoming dissatisfied with the socks. "Like explorers in the jungle who hand over rare green deer to spit and eat it with remorse, I stretched out my feet and pulled on the magnificent socks and then my shoes." does not, in my opinion, mean that he is afraid of destroying these beloved socks, but rather that they are so beautiful, like a rare animal is beloved to an explorer, that it is a tragedy to use them for his own "selfish" needs. i.e. keeping warm in the winter or in the example of the explorer, eating them to keep from starving. I think that he comes to the conclusion by the end that the socks are "twice beautiful" meaning that they are both aesthetically pleasing, as well as functional, and that makes them all the better.

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Tyler Woods
05/07/2013 7:32am

"Ode to My Socks"


T:referring to her socks as being beautiful as her ode.

P: she was given knew socks that had been hand knitted, they were as soft as rabbits.
she put them on as if they were cases, made with threats of twilight and goatskin
“violent” her feet were two fish, two sharks. color of the sea, one golden thread
two blackbirds, two cannons. feet were honored by the heavenly socks
The socks were handsome and her feet seemed unacceptable like fireman unworthy of a fire of glowing socks.

Tempted to save them somewhere like where schoolboys would keep fireflies, as men collected sacred books/letters. Resisted impulse to put them in a cage and give them bird food like explorers in the jungle hand over very rare deer to eat with remorse
she put on the magnificent socks and then shoes.

theres a moral to the ode that beauty is twice beauty and what’s good is doube good and its in a matter of two socks made of wool in the winter time.

C: imagery: her slipping her feet into the socks, imagining her feet as fish and sharks
mood: joyful and happy about this pair of socks
simile : “keep fireflies, as learned men collect sacre texts”, like explorers in the jungle, “ two socks as soft as rabbits”
metaphor: “ with her sheepherders hands”, “my feet were two fish made of wool, two long sharks sea blue, shot through by one golden thread”,” two immense blackbirds, two cannons”

A: loving because she loves the new socks and doesn’t want anything to happen to them.

S: on almost every other line she talks about a different reasoning to the socks.

T: the ode represents why she loves the socks

T: it’s saying/ representing how much she likes the socks that her friend has made and given her. how much she truly adores them

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Tyler Woods
05/07/2013 7:38am

"Ode to My Socks

I felt that Ode to My Socks was a great poem by Pablo Neruda. He used many literary devices and it gave the poem a since of live spirit. He used similes such as "two socks as soft as rabbits.". Also he used personification such as "I resisted the mad impulse to put them
in a golden cage and each day give them
birdseed and pieces of pink melon.". This was sort of humorous to me because I looked at this as imagery too. Watching him "trying" to feed his socks while they are trapped up in a cage. I found this poem very interesting.

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Sam Wade
05/07/2013 7:56pm

I thought the poem was very interesting too . When he added in the personififcation about his feet being looked up in a cage and feed birdseeds, I felt that made the poem more interesting and humorous , which in turn made the poem more appealing to the reader. I also agree that the devices that the poet used made the poem have a live and humorous spirit.

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Sam Wade
05/07/2013 7:51pm

To me, "Ode to My Socks" by Pablo Neruda was a very Interesting poem. The poem was easy to interpret and the thoughts of the poet were easy to understand. He used many Literary techniques to make the poem interesting and appealing to the reader. One technique he used was metaphors as in the line " Two long Sharks" , in this line he is comparing his own feet to the size of two sharks. To me, this adds a sense of humor to the poem. Another technique he used was personification. In this line from the poem "They were so handsome for the first time my feet seemed to me unacceptable like two decrepit firemen", he gives his feet human qualities such as being handsome and like firemen. This also adds a sense of humor to the poem and makes it more interesting.








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Braden Weber
05/08/2013 6:49pm

Pablo Neruda uses similes in “Ode to My Socks” to show that two socks can be labeled as one beautiful pair. The socks in this poem symbolize life's beauties and how they often come in pairs. He uses his first simile, “two socks as soft as rabbits.” to describe the soft socks that were given to him. He later emphasizes with another simile that the socks were “like two decrepit firemen,/ firemen unworthy of that woven fire,” This is where Neruda starts twisting the poem and the beauty of socks is actually referencing the beauty of two things that are unlikely to be beautiful.

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